The Crystal Palace: The Diary of Lily Hicks, London, 1850.

The 15th of October 1851 marked the closure of The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations, held in the Crystal Palace in London’s Hyde Park. It had been enormously successful, having had more than six million visitors during its nearly six months’ run. Henry Talbot, amongst others, recognised the event as a pivotal moment in the progress of photography. It should have.

Antique c1851 steel engraving of The Crystal Palace for the Grand International Exhibition of 1851 in Hyde Park, London. The Crystal Palace was a cast-iron and plate-glass building originally erected in Hyde Park, London, England, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. More than 14,000 exhibitors from around the world gathered in the Palace's 990,000 square feet (92,000 m2) of exhibition space.


Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

Nevertheless, this article attempts to provide a brief history of the great exhibition, which examines the planning and execution of this wondrous event, as well as the reactions to it and the considerable legacy it left behind. Left: Crystal Palace (1851), East End. Photographer: Henry Fox Talbot. 1851.

Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

The Crystal Palace was constructed for the Great Exhibition, which displayed the international advances in technology, and foremost, the manufacture and industrial accomplishments of the British. The structure accompanied the innovations of the Industrial Revolution that the Great Exhibition of 1851 embodied. The increase and improvement of.

Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

Crystal Palace Steel engraving of interior during the Great Exhibition, 1851. Iconographic Collections Keywords: Great Exhibition; Crystal Palace (London, England); J. E. Mayall; W. Lacey.

 

Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

Crystal Palace (London, England) Sources found: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 8th ed., 1852-1860, viewed online Apr. 19, 2013 (Crystal Palace; erected on the south side of Hyde Park for the Great Exhibition of 1851; designed by Joseph Paxton; the Crystal Palace was taken down some time after the Exhibition closed on October 11, 1851).

Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

The Crystal Palace was a glass and cast iron structure built in London, England, for the Great Exhibition of 1851.The building was designed by Sir Joseph Paxton, an architect and gardener, and.

Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations in 1851 was the first universal exhibition. It took place from May 1 to October 15, 1851 in London. The official opening of the exhibition took place in Hyde Park, in the Crystal Palace, a huge building glass (400 tons) and metal ( 4,000 tons), designed for the occasion by landscape designer Joseph Paxton ( 1801 1865).

Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

Queen Victoria opens the Great Exhibition at Crystal Palace in Hyde Park. The Great Exhibition of 1851 ran from May to October and during this time six million people passed through those crystal doors. The event proved to be the most successful ever staged and became one of the defining points of the nineteenth century.

 

Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

The Great Exhibition Crystal Palace 1851 - A Collection of 19 Publications. Catalogue of a Collection of Works on, or having Reference to The Exhibition of 1851. Dickinsons' Comprehensive Pictures of The Great Exhibition of 1851.

Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

The Great Exhibition, also known as the Crystal Palace Exhibition, was an international exhibition held in Hyde Park, London, England, from 1 May to 15 October 1851 and the first in a series of World's Fair exhibitions of culture and industry that were to be a popular 19th century feature. The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations (its full title) was organized under the.

Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

See also folder Victoria and Albert. The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations or The Great Exhibition housed in the Crystal Palace was an international exhibition that took place in Hyde Park, London, from 1 May to 11 October 1851. It was the first in a series of World's Fair exhibitions of culture and industry that became popular in the 19th century.

Crystal palace london great exhibition 1851

The Crystal Palace: The Diary of Lily Hicks, London 1850-1851 by Frances Mary Hendry is a kids' Scholastic book interesting enough for all ages. This book chronicled the construction of The Crystal Palace for The Great Exhibition in 1851 through the eyes of a fourteen-year-old housemaid. I found it charming and revealing. In this novel, Lily becomes a housemaid in the home of Joseph Paxton.

 


The Crystal Palace: The Diary of Lily Hicks, London, 1850.

Over 100 metres above the Thames, Crystal Palace in South-East London was the chosen site to relocate the Great Exhibition of 1851 from Hyde Park. The anatomically inaccurate but utterly charming Grade I-listed concrete dinosaurs (designed by sculptor and natural history artist Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins) were created for the amusement and education of its visitors. As a South Londoner, I.

The Great Exhibition of 1851 was the step to further equality and breaking down of barriers to the lower socio-economic groups who beforehand could only dream and wish of being close to the upper echelons of society were now in direct contact with them at the Great Exhibition of 1851, “The Crystal Palace was an apt if unconscious symbol of this new state of affairs: the walls were all of.

The Great Exhibition 1851 Sunday, September 25, 2011. Crystal Palace The iconic image of the Great Exhibition is of the Crystal Palace, a vast, glasshouse-like structure in 20 acres of central London's Hyde Park. It proved central to the Exhibition's success, but was by no means a foregone conclusion. Background In February 185, the building committee appointed by the Royal Commission.

The Great Exhibition in the Crystal Palace, Hyde Park, London: the opening by Queen Victoria. Steel engraving by H. Bibby, 1851.

Fig 1.1: Paxton’s Crystal Palace, The Art Journal Illustrated Catalogue: The Industry of All Nations, 1851 (London: George Virtue, 1851), p.xiv 23 Fig 1.2: Plan showing interior arrangement of the ground floor and upper galleries at the Great Exhibition including details of exhibits.

The Crystal Palace was originally created by Joseph Paxton to house the Exhibition of the Industry of all Nations that was to be staged in Hyde Park, London in 1851. When, after six months, the Great Exhibition closed its doors over six million people had visited it. Joseph Paxton was knighted and public opinion clamoured, without success, for the Crystal Palace to remain in the park.